Framing

I used two different framing methods when building my micro homes: The first, post and beam; the second, conventional 2x6 framing.  I really love the beauty of post and beam.  The first house I built, I treated it like an art project; it was a home I was going to live in.  The second home was an investment; something I was going to rent out to create passive income.  I chose stick framing on the second house to keep the cost down, and the production levels up.  In retrospect it didn't feel like I accomplished anything faster the second go around, but something tells me it was a lot quicker.  Doing it over again, and in any new build of mine, I'd like to incorporate the beauty of post and beam construction.  

Here are a few photos of the first build using post and beam.

For the frame of the first house, I used rough 4x4s and 6x6s.  The 6x6s made up the skids, the posts, and the beams, while the 4x4s made up the roof rafters.  It was quite a beautiful project.  I used 2x10s for the floor joists, 3/4" OSB for the sub floor, and 1/2 OSB for the wall sheathing.  In between the posts, I framed the voids with 2x4 on 24" centers.  The dimensions of the cabin are 12'x16' at the base, and 13'6" high.  I built the houses with the intent of moving them on highways, so I was restricted with height and width, but it did give me a lot more freedom than a tiny house on trailer restricted to 8'6".

Here are a few photos of the second build frame.

I was eager and bored after finishing the first house, and I started construction on the second on Jan 11, 2016.  It was the mildest winter I've ever seen -- Another reason to change the ways we live.  I used 2x8s to build the base.  It consisted of two beams, and floor joists.  I picked up some inexpensive rake windows for this house, as you can see in the frame; sadly I messed that up, and still have those windows collecting dust.  Of all the trades you can learn building a small house, there is nothing that can compete with framing for feeling good!